It is the question I've heard echoed over the last six years, "What inspired you to pursue a career in photography?".  It is hard not to laugh when I think of all the reactions people have given when I reply that it was actually by accident. Through the course of time, many artist have manifested their most brilliant work in the most vulnerable places of their lives. For me, this couldn't be more accurate.

Before I discovered my passions, I didn't have much of a life worth living. Consumed by self-loathing, addiction, and pure disdain for society, I had no sense of direction for where my life was headed. Growing up in a quiet farm-town didn't really cater to my sensibilities as a young artist. I had always felt like an outlier within my social circles, so I often floated around to get by. The problem was that I had no real foundation or sense of self to hold onto. Once I removed myself from that environment, the vulnerability as an eighteen year old living away from home really took flight. I let go of myself, my  fears, my ill relationships, and to some degree my sanity. I had to lose myself to find myself. After a year of deconstructing, my grandmother was diagnosed with cancer. It was a hard reality to accept, but it gave me a platform to stand-up and to some degree grow-up.  Throughout the course of her treatment, we often feared losing her to the aggressive chemotherapy and radiation that was damaging her body. As fate would have it, a wrench got thrown into the mix. At thirty seven years old, my mother suffered a fatal heart-attack. This single incident changed the course of my life almost immediately. A mask that had once prevented me from seeing the beauty in the world was finally removed. My grandmother is a proud Cherokee Indian, and had been growing her hair for years as a tribute to her tribe. Unfortunately, her hair started falling out in large quantities once she began her cancer treatments. She wanted to commemorate her efforts by taking photos, and proposed that I be the one to help her do it. After we published the photos online, I started getting a lot of positive feedback on the content. One person asked if I could take photos for them and it sort of snowballed from there. Who could have imagined that tragedy could bring such a special gift? Certainly not me.

We often find ourselves trying to navigate through the obstacles of life. The paradigm shifts, the relationships we make and break, the people we lose, the adversities we face. All of these factors force us to reflect and then to react. It forces you to be accountable for your own life and responsible for the way that you effect the environment around you. With that being said, I did not consciously set-out to pursue my craft, rather it manifested through tragedy and indifference.

What inspired YOU to pursue YOUR craft?

It is the question I've heard echoed over the last six years, "What inspired you to pursue a career in photography?".  It is hard not to laugh when I think of all the reactions people have given when I reply that it was actually by accident. Through the course of time, many artist have manifested their most brilliant work in the most vulnerable places of their lives. For me, this couldn't be more accurate.

Before I discovered my passions, I didn't have much of a life worth living. Consumed by self-loathing, addiction, and pure disdain for society, I had no sense of direction for where my life was headed. Growing up in a quiet farm-town didn't really cater to my sensibilities as a young artist. I had always felt like an outlier within my social circles, so I often floated around to get by. The problem was that I had no real foundation or sense of self to hold onto. Once I removed myself from that environment, the vulnerability as an eighteen year old living away from home really took flight. I let go of myself, my  fears, my ill relationships, and to some degree my sanity. I had to lose myself to find myself. After a year of deconstructing, my grandmother was diagnosed with cancer. It was a hard reality to accept, but it gave me a platform to stand-up and to some degree grow-up.  Throughout the course of her treatment, we often feared losing her to the aggressive chemotherapy and radiation that was damaging her body. As fate would have it, a wrench got thrown into the mix. At thirty seven years old, my mother suffered a fatal heart-attack. This single incident changed the course of my life almost immediately. A mask that had once prevented me from seeing the beauty in the world was finally removed. My grandmother is a proud Cherokee Indian, and had been growing her hair for years as a tribute to her tribe. Unfortunately, her hair started falling out in large quantities once she began her cancer treatments. She wanted to commemorate her efforts by taking photos, and proposed that I be the one to help her do it. After we published the photos online, I started getting a lot of positive feedback on the content. One person asked if I could take photos for them and it sort of snowballed from there. Who could have imagined that tragedy could bring such a special gift? Certainly not me.

We often find ourselves trying to navigate through the obstacles of life. The paradigm shifts, the relationships we make and break, the people we lose, the adversities we face. All of these factors force us to reflect and then to react. It forces you to be accountable for your own life and responsible for the way that you effect the environment around you. With that being said, I did not consciously set-out to pursue my craft, rather it manifested through tragedy and indifference.

What inspired YOU to pursue YOUR craft?